Autocratic Management

This type of management follows a top-down approach, with one-way communication from bosses to employees.

This is the most controlling of the different management styles, with the management making all workplace decisions and holding all of the power.

Employees are monitored closely as they perform within clearly defined perimeters.

Employees are not encouraged to ask questions, submit ideas, or share their thoughts on improving processes, and are in some cases actively discouraged from doing so.

 

 

Autocratic Management

The 3 subtypes of autocratic management style are authoritative, persuasive, and paternalistic.

  1. Authoritative
  • In this style, managers dictate exactly what they require their staff do and punish those who do not comply.
  • Employees are expected to follow orders, not question the authority of management, and perform their tasks the same way each time.
  • Managers monitor the employees closely, micromanaging their performance without placing trust or confidence that their employees can achieve their goals without direct and constant supervision. These types of managers believe that without this supervision, employees will not operate successfully.

Pros:

  • This management style allows quick decision making, and creates clearly defined roles and expectations.
  • With unskilled workers or large teams, setting clear and solid expectations can allow staff to operate without uncertainty.
  • Performance will increase, but only when the manager is present.

Cons:

  • The negatives of authoritative management style includes an increase in the dissatisfaction of employees, which leads to higher turnover, resentment, a lack of professional development and employee engagement, and the formation of an ‘us’ versus ‘them’ mentality between employees and management.
  • Innovation is stifled and inefficient processes will remain in place.

When to use this style

If decisions need to be made and executed quickly, for example in a time or clinical crisis, this management style can be sued successfully otherwise  it should be avoided

 

 

  1. Persuasive

 

 

  • In this style, managers use their persuasive skills to convince employees that the unilateral decisions that the manager implements are for the good of the team or clinic.
  • Rather than simply ordering employees to perform tasks, managers using this style would invite questions and would explain the decision-making process and rationale behind policies. This can help employees feel as though they are a more trusted and valued part of the staff and are involved in key business decisions, this helps reduce the resentment or tension between management and staff.

Pros:

 

  • Management can establish a higher level of trust between themselves and employees, and employees will accept top-down decisions more easily.
  • Employees respond more positively to reason and logic than they do the threat of punishment, and may feel less constricted than those managed with an authoritative style.

Cons:

  • Employees may feel limited due to restrictions and frustrated that they cannot give feedback, create solutions, or upskill in a meaningful way.

When to use this style

This style can be used when you have more experience than the team you are leading, so essentially you are the expert

 

 

  1. Paternalistic
  • In this style, the manager acts with the best interests of their subordinates at heart.
  • Usually, the clinic will refer to staff as ‘family’ and ask for loyalty and trust from employees.
  • Management using this style will use unilateral decision making but will explain to employees that the decision-makers are working from a place of expertise. Decisions are explained to employees, but there is no room for collaboration or questioning.

Pros:

  • A paternalistic manager is focused on the welfare of their employees, and will base their decisions on what is best for their staff.
  • Upskilling and employee education are valued, leading to happier, more skilled, more productive employees.

Cons:

  • Employees can become too dependent on management, leading to a lack of innovation and problem-solving.
  • There is a high chance of this style breeding resentment among employees who do not believe in the ‘clinic as family’ concept.
  • Employees might find this style condescending and feel like they are treated like children

When to use this style

This style maybe useful for smaller clinics but should be avoided by larger businesses.